Sewer Inspection

Avoid Costly Surprises

 I recommend to all buyers that they obtain a sewer inspection if the home is older than 20 years. Although the sewer line may be fairly new as compared to homes built before 1950, for example, tree roots can still clog up a 20-year-old sewer line.

Reasons to Inspect the Sewer Linesewer inspection

Tree roots growing into sewer lines is a common problem. Roots crawl into tiny openings and expand in the sewer line, latching on to other debris that typically cause backups such as grease or eggshell waste. Sometimes chemicals can kill the trees roots but if the roots reappear, the pipe may be damaged and require excavation to fix the problem.

Many homes built in the 1950s have sewer lines made from tar paper called Orangeburg pipes. These disintegrate and collapse over time. If a home has Orangeburg, the sewer line definitely needs to be replaced.

How to Inspect a Sewer Line

A snake attached to a small video camera into the clean-out and snakes the camera through the sewer. You can watch the image on a monitor. Not only will the inspector find out if the sewer line is clean or clogged, but the inspection will disclose the condition of the sewer. Ask the inspector to tell you what kind of material was used to construct the sewer line and whether that type of material is considered good construction today.

Results From Sewer Inspections

If repairs are recommended, the inspector will also provide a written professional opinion of the approximate repair costs, which can be used as an unbiased point of comparison when acquiring repair estimates from any potential contractors.

We do not perform any repair work or service to the sewer system, which allows us to remain completely objective and unbiased in our findings